Recent Entries:

  • November 11th, 2007

    In The Bad Girl, Ricardo Somocurcio tells the story of his lifelong love for Lily the Chilean girl, Comrade Arlette, Madame Robert Arnoux, Mrs. David Richardson, Kuriko, Otilita, and his wife Mrs. Somocurcio – the serial identities of the bad girl. She first appears as teenaged Lily, moved to Lima with her family from Santiago.

  • November 7th, 2007

    Yesterday at a business meeting, I met a board member of the Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. “Doctors aren’t having fun anymore,” he said. “They’re saying the profession is becoming as standardized and routine as practicing law. The insurance companies want the MD to spend just fifteen minutes with a patient. That’s all he or she gets compensated for.

  • November 4th, 2007

    “Style,” wrote Robert Frost, “is that which indicates how the writer takes himself and what he is saying. It is the mind skating circles around itself as it moves forward." As a stylish statement, those sentences suggest that Frost took himself as a pithy speaker dizzied by circuitous thought, steadied by belief in progression, poem by poem.

  • October 27th, 2007

    Writing about Roethke, William Meredith said, “All the writers who go on concerning us after their deaths are men and women who have escaped from a confused human identity into the identity they willed and consented to.” Our population is a clamor of confused human identities, so having one (or having had one) isn’t a mark of distinction.

  • October 16th, 2007

    In “From the Bardo Zone,” Lucia Perillo writes about visiting a creek where salmon come to spawn and die. “Don’t get me wrong; I’m grateful for the people who push me out when I bog down in the mud,” she says.

  • October 12th, 2007

    Later this month, New Directions will publish John Allman’s eighth book of poems, Lowcountry. He retired from teaching 10 years ago (for 26 years he taught at Rockland Community College of SUNY) and has spent the past decade’s winters as a non-golf playing resident of Hilton Head, South Carolina. At 72, he continues to evolve as a poet.