Recent Entries:

  • August 4th, 2007

    “ 'What is not said, tends to nonexistence.' It’s astonishing to think about the multitude of events in the twentieth century and about the people taking part in them, and to realize that every one of those situations deserved an epic, a tragedy, or a lyric poem. But nothing – they sank, leaving only a faint trace.

  • August 4th, 2007

    Boris Pasternak and Marina Tsvetaeva conducted a correspondence between 1922 and 1936, though they rarely met. (Rilke joined to make the exchange triangular for a few years.) It was not until 2000, when the archive of Tsvetaeva's papers was finally opened, that the entire exchange could be fully appreciated.

  • August 4th, 2007

    In 2005 Weinberger published What Happened Here: Bush Chronicles, a collection of his political articles (NBCC prize nominee). He's returned with literary work, but it's quite different from his past essay collections, such as Works on Paper.

  • July 28th, 2007

    This past April, Coffee House Press brought out David Hilton's final book, Living Will. Hilton died in 2005 at age 67. In the book's afterword, Dave Clewell aptly calls Hilton "a spiritual grandson of Whitman and a son of the good Dr.

  • July 28th, 2007

    Seidel's been around for a long time. He was a founding editor of The Paris Review and conducted its 1961 interview with Robert Lowell ("The Art of Poetry, No. 3"). His first book was published in 1963.

  • July 24th, 2007

    In the June 28 issue of New York Review of Books, Andrew O'Hagan criticized "DeLillo's failure in Falling Man to imagine September 11." He also lectured that "good prose in a novel depends on its ability to exhale a secret knowledge, to have the exact weight of magic in relation to the material, the true moral rhythm." But imagining September 11 itself is not what this novel is p